Into Twilight - P R Adams

Into Twilight

By P R Adams

  • Release Date: 2017-09-10
  • Genre: Science Fiction
Score: 4.5
4.5
From 67 Ratings

Description

He does the government’s dirty work. When he’s double-crossed by one of his own, he’ll stop at nothing to take out the trash.

Korea, 22nd Century. Surrender isn’t in Stefan Mendoza’s DNA. So when a traitor betrays his black-ops team, he alone pushes through the torture and escapes with revenge burning in his mind. On the verge of a systems failure, he taps into his underground network for a set of cybernetic limbs. But his high-tech recovery comes at a heavy price— an assassination hit on a rising political star. 

Filled with resentment for the cutthroat world of contract killers, he uses the hit job as a cover to track down the traitor. When he discovers he’s competing with other assassins for the same political target, he starts to piece together a sinister conspiracy that could lead him straight to the shadowy figure behind his betrayal. 

Trapped within a hotbed of corruption, can Mendoza exact his revenge and win his freedom or will he spiral deeper into the twisted game of brokered death? 

Into Twilight is the first book in The Stefan Mendoza Trilogy of high-octane cyberpunk techno-thrillers. If you like street-smart soldiers, complex conspiracies, and immersive sci-fi settings, then you'll love P.R. Adams noir-style page-turner.

Buy Into Twilight to take a walk on the dark side of justice today!

Reviews

  • Outrightly Awesome!

    5
    By Tansterman
    When I first saw this title, after having read Gibson's Neuromancer and Stephenson’s Snowcrash years ago, not to mention the entirety of Iain M. Banks’ SF titles, I thought this was just another wannabe series in the same genre that wouldn’t measure up. However, I’m pleased to report that Adams has smoothly eased himself into a place amongst the ruling pantheon of cyberpunk gods. Pacing has been breakneck and consistency has been solid without any glitches. Geeky detail is a bit light but acceptable without it becoming a tech spec sheet read. I’m also glad that this is a self-contained novel that tidies itself up by the end while leaving openings for the sequels. An exceptionally good read on the level of the old masters that are Gibson, Stephenson. Banks, et al.